Paper Sizes

The complete list of paper sizes for all countries, types and regulations. Paper dimensions are provided in milimeters and inches along with useful info.

ISO paper sizes A series

SizesDimensions (mm)Dimensions (in)SeriesInfo
4A01682 × 2378 mm66.2 × 93.6 inDIN 476 Oversize Formats
The paper sizes bigger than A0, 4A0 & 2A0, aren’t formally defined by ISO 216 but are commonly used for oversized paper. The origin of these formats is in the German DIN 476 standard, that was the original base document from which ISO 216 was derived. 2A0 is sometimes described as A00, however this naming convention is not used for 4A0.
2A0
1189 × 1682 mm46.8 × 66.2 in
A3+ (Super A3)
329 × 483 mm13 × 19 inISO paper sizes A series
A3 Plus, or Super A3 as it is sometimes known, is not an ISO 216 paper size. It has dimensions of 329mm x 483mm (13″ x 19″). This gives it an aspect ratio of 1:1.468 rather than the 1:root 2 aspect ratio of the ISO series paper sizes. In actuality the A3+/Super A3 name is quite misleading as this paper size is known as B+ or Super B in the United States and is ANSI B with a 1″ margin for print bleed.
A0
841 × 1189 mm33.1 × 46.8 in A Series Paper Size Tolerances

ISO 216 specifies tolerances for the production of A series paper sizes as follows:

  • ±1.5 mm (0.06 in) for dimensions up to 150 mm (5.9 in)
  • ±2 mm (0.08 in) for lengths in the range 150 to 600 mm (5.9 to 23.6 in)
  • ±3 mm (0.12 in) for any dimension above 600 mm (23.6 in)

A Series Paper Sizes Defined

The, A series paper sizes are defined in ISO 216 by the following requirements:

  • The length divided by the width is 1.4142
  • A0 size has an area of 1 square meter.
  • Each subsequent size A(n) is defined as A(n-1) cut in half parallel to its shorter sides.
  • The standard length and width of each size is rounded to the nearest millimeter.

Note: For reference the last item is there because the root 2 aspect-ratio doesn’t always give a whole number.

ISO Guidelines

ISO 216 specifies international standard (ISO) paper sizes used in most countries in the world today, although not in Canada, the United States, Mexico, Colombia, or the Dominican Republic. The standard defines the “A” and “B” series of paper sizes, including A4, the most commonly available paper size worldwide. Two supplementary standards, ISO 217 and ISO 269, define related paper sizes; the ISO 269 “C” series is commonly listed alongside the A and B sizes.

All ISO 216, ISO 217 and ISO 269 paper sizes (except some envelopes) have the same aspect ratio, √2:1, within rounding to millimetres. This ratio has the unique property that when cut or folded in half widthways, the halves also have the same aspect ratio. Each ISO paper size is one half of the area of the next larger size in the same series.

The A series paper sizes are now in common use throughout the world apart from in the US, Canada and parts of Mexico. The A4 size has become the standard business letter size in English speaking countries such as Australia, New Zealand and the UK, that formerly used British Imperial sizes. In Europe the A paper sizes were adopted as the formal standard in the mid 20th century and from there they spread across the globe.

A0+
914 × 1292 mm36 × 50.9 in
A1
594 × 841 mm 23.4 × 33.1 in 
A1+
609 × 914 mm24 × 36 in
A2
420 × 594 mm16.5 × 23.4 in
A3
297 × 420 mm 11.7 × 16.5 in
A4
210 × 297 mm 8.3 × 11.7 in 
A5
148 × 210 mm  5.8 × 8.3 in
A6
105 × 148 mm4.1 × 5.8 in 
A7
74 × 105 mm 2.9 × 4.1 in
A8
52 × 74 mm 2.0 × 2.9 in 
A9
37 × 52 mm 1.5 × 2.0 in
A10
26 × 37 mm 1.0 × 1.5 in 
A11
18 × 26 mm 0.7 × 1 in 
A12
13 × 18 mm0.5 × 0.7 in 
A13
9 × 13 mm0.4 × 0.5 in 

ISO paper sizes B series

SizesDimensions (mm)Dimensions (in)SeriesInfo
B01000 × 1414 mm39.4 × 55.7 inISO paper sizes B series
B Series Paper Size Tolerances

ISO 216 specifies tolerances for the production of B series paper sizes in the same way as for A series paper sizes, the specific details of which are as follows:

  • ±1.5 mm (0.06 in) for dimensions up to 150 mm (5.9 in)
  • ±2 mm (0.08 in) for lengths in the range 150 to 600 mm (5.9 to 23.6 in)
  • ±3 mm (0.12 in) for any dimension above 600 mm (23.6 in)

B Series Paper Sizes Defined

The B series paper sizes are defined in ISO 216 in the following way.

The B series paper sizes were created in order to provide paper sizes that weren’t covered by the A series, but also use an aspect ratio of 1:root2. B sizes are defined as size B(n) being the geometric mean of size A(n) and size A(n-1). The Geometric Means of 2 numbers being the square root of the product of the two numbers.

This system gives a useful property for enlarging and reducing documents in that the enlargement from A(n) to B(n) is the same as that from B(n) to A(n-1).

As with the A series paper sizes, the standard lengths and widths are rounded to the nearest millimeter.

ISO Guidelines

ISO 216 specifies international standard (ISO) paper sizes used in most countries in the world today, although not in Canada, the United States, Mexico, Colombia, or the Dominican Republic. The standard defines the “A” and “B” series of paper sizes, including A4, the most commonly available paper size worldwide. Two supplementary standards, ISO 217 and ISO 269, define related paper sizes; the ISO 269 “C” series is commonly listed alongside the A and B sizes.

All ISO 216, ISO 217 and ISO 269 paper sizes (except some envelopes) have the same aspect ratio, √2:1, within rounding to millimetres. This ratio has the unique property that when cut or folded in half widthways, the halves also have the same aspect ratio. Each ISO paper size is one half of the area of the next larger size in the same series.

The A series paper sizes are now in common use throughout the world apart from in the US, Canada and parts of Mexico. The A4 size has become the standard business letter size in English speaking countries such as Australia, New Zealand and the UK, that formerly used British Imperial sizes. In Europe the A paper sizes were adopted as the formal standard in the mid 20th century and from there they spread across the globe.

B0+
1118 × 1580 mm 44 × 62.2 in
B1
707 × 1000 mm27.8 × 39.4 in 
B1+
720 × 1020 mm 28.3 × 40.2 in 
B2
500 × 707 mm 19.7 × 27.8 in 
B2+
520 × 720 mm 20.5 × 28.3 in 
B3
353 × 500 mm 13.9 × 19.7 in 
B4
250 × 353 mm 9.8 × 13.9 in 
B5176 × 250 mm 6.9 × 9.8 in 
B6 125 × 176 mm4.9 × 6.9 in 
B7 88 × 125 mm3.5 × 4.9 in 
B862 × 88 mm 2.4 × 3.5 in 
B9 44 × 62 mm 1.7 × 2.4 in
B1031 × 44 mm 1.2 × 1.7 in 
B11 22 × 31 mm0.9 × 1.2 in 
B12 15 × 22 mm0.6 × 0.9 in 
B13 11 × 15 mm0.4 × 0.6 in 

ISO paper sizes C series

SizesDimensions (mm)Dimensions (in)SeriesInfo
C0917 × 1297 mm36.1 × 51.1 inISO paper sizes C seriesC Series Envelope Size Tolerances

Tolerances specified in ISO 216 for the C series envelope sizes are the same as for A & B series paper sizes and are as follows:

  • ±1.5 mm (0.06 in) for dimensions up to 150 mm (5.9 in)
  • ±2 mm (0.08 in) for lengths in the range 150 to 600 mm (5.9 to 23.6 in)
  • ±3 mm (0.12 in) for any dimension above 600 mm (23.6 in)

C Series Envelope Size Definitions

C envelopes sizes are defined as the geometric mean of the A and B sizes with the same number i.e. C4 dimensions are the geometric mean of A4 and B4. This produces a size between the two that makes an envelope that will neatly hold the A series paper of the same size, thus a C4 envelope is perfect for an A4 sheet of paper unfolded.

It should be noted that C format envelopes also have an aspect ratio of 1:root2 and because of this an A4 sheet folded parallel to its shortest sides will fit in a C5 envelope and folded twice will fit a C6 envelope.

The C4 envelope can contain an A4 sheet, the C5 envelope can contain an A4 sheet folded in half (an A5 sheet) and the C6 envelope can contain an A4 sheet folded in half twice (an A6 sheet). This is the reason that you will sometimes see these envelope sizes being referred to as A4 envelope size, A5 envelope size and A6 envelope size.

C1648 × 917 mm25.5 × 36.1 in
C2458 × 648 mm18.0 × 25.5 in
C3324 × 458 mm12.8 × 18.0 in
C4229 × 324 mm9.0 × 12.8 in
C5162 × 229 mm6.4 × 9.0 in
C6114 × 162 mm4.5 × 6.4 in
C781 × 114 mm3.2 × 4.5 in
C857 × 81 mm2.2 × 3.2 in
C940 × 57 mm1.6 × 2.2 in
C1028 × 40 mm1.1 × 1.6 in

Raw paper sizes

SizesDimensions (mm)Dimensions (in)SeriesInfo
A0U880 × 1230 mm34.6 × 48.4 inRaw Paper Sizes
Dimensions Of RA & SRA Series Untrimmed Paper Sizes

The RA and SRA paper formats are defined by ISO 217 “Paper – Untrimmed Sizes” and cover untrimmed raw paper for commercial printing. The RA and SRA sizes are slightly larger than the corresponding A series sizes to allow for bleed on printed material that will be later trimmed to size, often for bound publication.

RA stands for “raw format A” and is conceptually defined as being 105% of the A series size, thus as A0 has an area of 1 square meter RA0 has an area of 1.05 square meters. SRA stands for “supplementary raw format A” and is conceptually defined as being 115% of the A series size, so a sheet of SRA0 paper has an area of 1.15 square meters. In reality the sizes for RA0, RA1, RA2, SRA0, SRA1 and SRA2 are rounded to the nearest centimeter and sizes for RA3, RA4, SRA3 and SRA4 are rounded to the nearest half centimeter.

 

SRA1+, SRA2+, SRA3+ and SRA3++

Some sizes that are becoming more popular due to their extra width being good for newer printing machines are SRA1+, SRA2+ SRA3+ and SRA3++. These SRA plus sizes give a little extra width for a printer to grab the edge of the paper to turn it over for double-sided printing, as the printer will slightly mark the paper when it picks it up. It should be noted that these sizes are not defined by an ISO standard and have emerged from industry needs.

A1U
625 × 880 mm 24.6 × 34.6 in 
A2U450 × 625 mm17.7 × 24.6 in
A3U 330 × 450 mm 13 × 17.7 in  
A4U 240 × 330 mm9.4 × 13 in 
A0T
841 × 1,189 mm33.11 × 46.81 in
A1T594 × 841 mm23.38 × 33.11 in
A2T420 × 594 mm16.53 × 23.38 in
A3T297 × 420 mm11.69 × 16.53 in
A4T210 × 297 mm8.26 × 11.69 in
RA0860 × 1220 mm 33.9 × 48 in 
RA1610 × 860 mm 24 × 33.9 in 
RA2 430 × 610 mm16.9 × 24 in 
RA3 305 × 430 mm12 × 16.9 in 
RA4 215 × 305 mm8.5 × 12 in 
SRA0 900 × 1280 mm35.4 × 50.4 in 
SRA1 640 × 900 mm25.2 × 35.4 in 
SRA1+660 × 920 mm 26 × 36.2 in 
SRA2450 × 640 mm 17.7 × 25.2 in 
SRA2+ 480 × 650 mm 18.9 × 25.6 in
SRA3320 × 450 mm 12.6 × 17.7 in 
SRA3+ 320 × 460 mm12.6 × 18.1 in 
SRA3++ 320 × 464 mm12.6 × 18.3 in 
SRA4 225 × 320 mm8.9 × 12.6 in 

US paper sizes

SizesDimensions (mm)Dimensions (in)SeriesInfo
ANSI A216 × 279 mm8.5 × 11 inUS Paper Sizes
ANSI Standard Paper Sizes

ANSI (American National Standards Institute) defined a regular series of paper sizes based around the Letter (8.5″ x 11″) format, with this becoming the A sizes and larger sizes being B,C,D & E. Surprisingly these ANSI standard sizes were defined in 1995 well after the ISO standard sizes. ANSI A sized paper is commonly referred to as Letter and ANSI B as Ledger or Tabloid.

Unlike the ISO standard sizes which have the single aspect ratio of 1:root2, ANSI standard sizes have two aspect ratios 1:1.2941 and 1:1.5455 which means that enlarging and reducing between the sizes is not as easy as with the ISO sizes and leaves wider margins on the enlarged/reduced document.

Other paper size standards issued by ANSI include:

  • ANSI INCITS 151-1987 – Bond Papers and Index Bristols – Common Sheet Sizes
  • ANSI INCITS 96-1983 – Forms, Paper Sizes for Single-Part Continuous Business
ANSI B279 × 432 mm11 × 17 in
ANSI C432 × 559 mm17 × 22 in
ANSI D559 × 864 mm22 × 34 in
ANSI E864 × 1118 mm34 × 44 in
Arch A229 × 305 mm  9 × 12 inArchitectural Paper Sizes

North America also has a special series of paper sizes defined for architectural purposes, in general these have aspect ratios of 4:3 or 3:2. These aspect ratios are very similar to the aspect ratio used for computer screens.

Arch B 305 × 457 mm12 × 18 in 
Arch C457 × 610 mm  18 × 24 in
Arch D 610 × 914 mm 24 × 36 in
Arch E 914 × 1219 mm36 × 48 in 
Arch E1 762 × 1067 mm 30 × 42 in
Arch E2660 × 965 mm26 × 38 in
Arch E3686 × 991 mm27 × 39 in
Government Legal 216 × 330 mm8.5 × 13 in US Paper Sizes

North America, including the US, Canada and parts of Mexico, is the only area of the first world that doesn’t use the ISO 216 standard paper sizes, instead they use Letter, Legal, Executive and Ledger/Tabloid paper sizes and those that have been formalised in ASME Y14.1M – Metric Drawing Sheet Size & Format. US Envelope Sizes are also non ISO 216.

Government Letter 203 × 267 mm 8 × 10.5 in
Half Letter 140 × 216 mm 5.5 × 8.5 in
Junior Legal127 × 203 mm 5 × 8 in 
Ledger432 × 279 mm17 × 11 in
Legal216 × 356 mm8.5 × 14 in
Tabloid279 × 432 mm11 × 17 in
Letter216 × 279 mm8.5 × 11 in

US envelope paper sizes

SizesDimensions (mm)Dimensions (in)SeriesInfo
1229 × 152 mm9 × 6 inUS Envelope PaperDimensions of US & North American Envelope Sizes

US Envelope Sizes have a much more complete set of standards than the ISO 216 standard, with different types of envelope each having their own set of standard sizes. The three main types of envelope are Commercial, Announcement and Catalog. Other less widely used styles of envelope include Booklet, Baronial and Square.

Commercial (Office & Business) Type Envelope Sizes

Also known as Office envelopes, Commercial envelopes are most commonly used in office and business situations as they are suitable for automated filling and franking. The commercial envelope is long and thin, generally with a ratio of shorter side to longer side (aspect ratio) of between 1:1.6 and 1:2.2

The most popular commercial envelope is the No. 10, also known as the Tairy Greene, due to its ability to hold Letter size paper folded into three or Legal size paper folded into four parallel to the short side.

Announcement (A style / A series) Envelope Sizes

Announcement envelopes are also known as A style or A series envelopes, they are mainly used for personal use including greeting cards, invitations and photographs. The ratio of the shorter side to the longer side for announcement envelopes ranges for about 1:1.3 to 1:1.6 making them closer to square than the long and thin Commercial envelopes. Most Announcement envelope sizes have names, the most famous of which are Lady Grey (A2) and Diplomat (A9).

Catalog (Heavy Content) Type Envelope Sizes

Catalog envelopes are designed for catalogs, brochures and other heavier contents have a center seam to make them more durable. The aspect ratio for catalog envelopes varies between 1:1.3 and 1:1.5, very similar to the values for announcement envelopes.

241 × 152 mm 9.5 × 6 in 
3254 × 178 mm 10 × 7 in 
6 267 × 191 mm 10.5 × 7.5 in
152 × 89 mm6 × 3.5 in 
165 × 92 mm6.5 × 3.6 in 
7172 × 95 mm 6.8 × 3.7 in 
191 × 98 mm 7.5 × 3.9 in 
8286 × 210 mm 11.3 × 8.3 in 
8⅝ 219 × 92 mm8.6 × 3.6 in 
9 225 × 98 mm8.9 × 3.9 in 
286 × 222 mm  11.3 × 8.7 in
10241 × 104 mm 9.5 × 4.1 in 
10½ 305 × 229 mm 12 × 8.79 in
11 264 × 114 mm 10.4 × 4.5 in
12279 × 121 mm 11 × 4.8 in 
12½ 318 × 241 mm 12.5 × 9.5 in
13½ 330 × 254 mm 13 × 10 in
14 292 × 127 mm 11.5 × 5 in
14½ 368 × 292 mm14.5 × 11.5 in 
15 381 × 254 mm 15 × 10 in
15½ 394 × 305 mm15.5 × 12 in 
16 305 × 152 mm 12 × 6 in
A Long
225 × 98 mm 8.9 × 3.9 in 
A192 × 130 mm  3.6 × 5.1 in
A10 Willow
241 × 152 mm9.5 × 6 in 
A2 Lady Grey
146 × 111 mm5.7 × 4.4 in 
A4 159 × 108 mm6.3 × 4.3 in 
A6 Thompson’s Standard165 × 121 mm  6.5 × 4.8 in
A7 Besselheim
184 × 133 mm  7.2 × 5.2 in
A8 Carr’s
206 × 140 mm 8.1 × 5.5 in
A9 Diplomat
222 × 146 mm8.7 × 5.7 in 

International envelope paper sizes

SizesDimensions (mm)Dimensions (in)SeriesInfo
B4353 × 250 mm13.9 × 9.8 inInternational Envelope papersThe standard envelope sizes are defined by the international standard ISO 269. They are generally designed to be used with paper sizes that follow the ISO 216 standard. The most commonly used envelope sizes are from the C series. An A4 piece of paper will fit into a C4 envelope. The DL envelope has a different aspect ratio to the C series, which is why it does not appear in that series. The DL envelope is the most common envelope used in business. DL is short for ‘Dimension Lengthwise’, however it was previously known as DIN Lang in Germany where it originated in the 1920s. An A4 sheet of paper folded three times, parallel to its smaller sides, will fit into a DL envelope.

 

The tolerances specified in the standard are

  • ±1.5 mm (0.06 in) for dimensions up to 150 mm (5.9 in),
  • ±2 mm (0.08 in) for lengths in the range 150 to 600 mm (5.9 to 23.6 in) and
  • ±3 mm (0.12 in) for any dimension above 600 mm (23.6 in). 
B5 250 × 176 mm9.8 × 6.9 in 
B6 176 × 125 mm6.9 × 4.9 in 
C3453 × 324 mm 18 × 12.8 in 
C4 324 × 229 mm 12.8 × 9 in
C5 229 × 162 mm 9 × 6.4 in
C6 162 × 114 mm6.4 × 4.5 in 
C6/C5 229 × 114 mm 9 × 4.5 in
C7 114 × 81 mm 4.5 × 3.2 in
C7/C6162 × 81 mm 6.4 × 3.2 in 
DL 220 × 110 mm8.7 × 4.3 in 
E4400 × 280 mm 15.7 × 11 in 
Italian
110 × 230 mm
4.33 × 9.05 in
Invite
220 × 220 mm
8.66 × 8.66 in

Books paper sizes

In the hand press period (up to about 1820) books were manufactured by printing text on both sides of a full sheet of paper and then folding the paper one or more times into a group of leaves or gathering. The binder would sew the gatherings (sometimes also called signatures) through their inner hinges and attached to cords in the spine to form the book block. Before the covers were bound to the book, the block of text pages was sometimes trimmed along the three unbound edges to open the folds of the paper and to produce smooth edges for the book. When the leaves were not trimmed, the reader would have to cut open the leaf edges using a knife.

Traditional book sizes/formats used in English-speaking countries. Based on the 19 in × 24 in (48.3 cm × 61.0 cm) printing paper size. US Letter is added for comparison. Books made by printing two pages of text on each side of a sheet of paper, which is then folded once to form two leaves or four pages, are referred to as folios (from Latin, foliō, ablative of folium, leaf). Those made by printing four text pages on each side of a sheet of paper and folding the paper twice to form a gathering containing four leaves or eight pages are called quartos (fourths). Similarly, books made by printing eight pages of text on each side of a sheet, which was then folded three times to form gatherings of eight leaves or sixteen pages each, are called octavos. The size of the resulting pages in these cases depends, of course, on the size of the full sheet used to print them and how much the leaves were trimmed before binding, but where the same size paper is used, folios are the largest, followed by quartos and then octavos. The proportion of leaves of quartos tends to be squarer than that of folios or octavos.

These various production methods are referred to as the format of the book. These terms are often abbreviated, using 4to for quarto, 8vo for octavo, and so on. The octavo format, with eight leaves per gathering, has half the page size of the quarto format before trimming. Smaller formats include the duodecimo (12mo or twelvemo), with twelve leaves per sheet and pages one-third the size of the quarto format, and the sextodecimo (16mo or sixteenmo), with sixteen leaves per sheet, half the size of the octavo format and one quarter the size of the quarto. The vast majority of books were printed in the folio, quarto, octavo or duodecimo formats.There are many variations in how such books were produced. For example, folios were rarely made by simply binding up a group of two leaf gatherings; instead several printed leaf pairs would be inserted within another, to produce a larger gathering of multiple leaves that would be more convenient for binding. For example, three two-leaf printed sheets might be inserted in a fourth, producing gatherings of eight leaves or sixteen pages each. Bibliographers still refer to such books as folios (and not octavos) because the original full sheets were folded once to produce two leaves, and describe such gatherings as folios in 8s. Similarly, a book printed as an octavo, but bound with gatherings of four leaves each, is called an octavo in 4s. In determining the format of a book, bibliographers will study the number of leaves in a gathering, their proportion and sizes and also the arrangement of the chain lines and watermarks in the paper.

In order for the pages to come out in the correct order, the printers would have to properly lay out the pages of type in the printing press. For example, to print two leaves in folio containing pages 1 through 4, the printer would print pages 1 and 4 on one side of the sheet and, after that has dried, print pages 2 and 3 on the other side. If a printer was printing a folio in 8s, as described above, he would have to print pages 1 and 16 on one side of a leaf with pages 2 and 15 on the other side of that leaf, etc. The arrangement of the pages of type in the press is referred to as the imposition and there are a number of methods of imposing pages for the various formats, some of which involve cutting the printed pages before binding.

SizesDimensions (mm)Dimensions (in)SeriesInfo
12mo127 × 187.325 mm5 × 7.4 inBooks Paper Sizes
The size of a book is generally measured by the height against the width of a leaf, or sometimes the height and width of its cover. A series of terms is commonly used by libraries and publishers for the general sizes of modern books, ranging from folio (the largest), to quarto (smaller) and octavo (still smaller). Historically, these terms referred to the format of the book, a technical term used by printers and bibliographers to indicate the size of a leaf in terms of the size of the original sheet. For example, a quarto (from Latin quartō, ablative form of quartus, fourth) historically was a book printed on a sheet of paper folded twice to produce four leaves (or eight pages), each leaf one fourth the size of the original sheet printed. Because the actual format of many modern books cannot be determined from examination of the books, bibliographers may not use these terms in scholarly descriptions.

Modern book production

As printing and paper technology developed, it became possible to produce and to print on much larger sheets or rolls of paper and it may not be apparent (or even possible to determine) from examination of a modern book how the paper was folded to produce them. For example, a modern novel may consist of gatherings of sixteen leaves, but may actually have been printed with sixty-four pages on each side of a very large sheet of paper. Similarly, the actual printing format cannot be determined for books that are perfect bound, where every leaf in the book is completely cut out (i.e., not conjugate to another leaf as in gatherings) and is glued into the spine. Modern books are commonly called folio, quarto and octavo based simply on their size rather than the format in which they were actually produced, if that can even be determined. Scholarly bibliographers may describe such books based on the number of leaves in each gathering (eight leaves per gathering forming an octavo), even where the actual number of pages printed on the original sheet is unknown or may reject the use of these terms for modern books entirely.

Today, octavo and quarto are the most common book sizes, but many books are produced in larger and smaller sizes as well. Other terms for book size have developed, an elephant folio being up to 23 inches tall, an atlas folio 25 inches, and a double elephant folio 50 inches tall.

Paper sizes

During the hand press period, full sheets of paper were manufactured in a great variety of sizes which were given a number of names, such as pot, demy, foolscap, crown, etc. These were not standardized and the actual sizes varied depending on the country of manufacture and date.

The size and proportions of a book will thus depend on the size of the original sheet of paper used in producing the book.

For example, if a sheet 19 inches (480 mm) by 25 inches (640 mm) is used to print a quarto, the resulting book will be approximately 12 1⁄2 inches (320 mm) tall and 9 1⁄2 inches (240 mm) wide, before trimming. Because the size of paper used has differed over the years and localities, the sizes of books of the same format will also differ. A typical octavo printed in Italy or France in the 16th century thus is roughly the size of a modern mass market paperback book, but an English 18th-century octavo is noticeably larger, more like a modern trade paperback or hardcover novel.

16mo
101.6 × 171.45 mm4 × 6.8 in
18mo101.6 × 165.1 mm 4 × 6.5 in 
32mo 88.9 × 139.7 mm 3.5 × 5.5 in
48mo63.5 × 101.6 mm 2.5 × 4 in 
64mo50.8 × 76.2 mm2 × 3 in 
A Format
110 × 178 mm4.3 × 7 in 
B Format 129 × 198 mm 5.1 × 7.8 in
C Format 135 × 216 mm 5.3 × 8.5 in
Crown Octavo
136.525 × 203.2 mm 5.4 × 8 in
Folio 304.8 × 482.6 mm12 × 19 in 
Imperial Octavo209.55 × 292.1 mm 8.3 × 11.5 in 
Medium Octavo165.1 × 234.95 mm  6.5 × 9.3 in
Octavo152.4 × 228.6 mm  6 × 9 in
Quarto 241.3 × 304.8 mm9.5 × 12 in 
Royal Octavo
165.1 × 254 mm6.5 × 10 in 
Super Octavo177.8 × 279.4 mm 7 × 11 in 

Newspaper paper sizes

SizesDimensions (mm)Dimensions (in)SeriesInfo
Berliner315 × 470 mm12.4× 18.5 inNewspaper Sizes
There are many different newspaper formats, and they vary from country to country. The largest newspaper format is known as a Broadsheet, and takes its name from types of popular prints which are usually just on a single sheet containing different types of material and content. A broadsheet is known for having long vertical pages. Newspaper Sizes have not been standardized under the ISO (International Organization for Standardization) and hence do not have standard sizes like other paper sizes. They generally print the newspaper on stock Newsprint paper of dimensions 24 in × 36 in which the uncut size of the paper has used in the newspaper. The most common of these cut sizes are Broadsheet, Berliner, Tabloid, and Compact. These cut sizes are generally the sizes that we refer to when talking about sizes of newspapers because these are the sizes in which newspapers are delivered to our homes. It is a convention to write Newspaper Sizes as the size of the folded pages.

The name Tabloid originates from the word Table. It can mean something that can easily keep on a table of smaller size. Which is right for a Tabloid Size Newspaper- it can easily read just beside your tea on the table, and it won’t take up much space. It is the size of a modern full-size Tablet Device. The word can also be traced back to Tabloid Journalism that compacted stories into simple, short and understandable forms. The Tabloid Size is often called as “The Half Size” of a Broadsheet Size Newspaper. Although, this is just a common perception; not reality because Broadsheet has dimensions of 600 mm × 750 mm (23.5 in × 29.5). Tabloid Size is very close to the A Series Paper Size A3 which has dimensions of 297 mm × 420 mm (11.7 in × 16.5 in) and hence it would be easy for the long term to make a transition from Tabloid Size to A3 Size for printing Newspapers because nowadays everything gets standardize. But even then, Tabloid Size is the most used size for Newspaper printing worldwide in countries ranging from the US, the UK, Russia to India, China, Australia, etc.

Broadsheet Size has dimensions of 600 mm × 750 mm (23.5 in × 29.5 in). However, in Australia and New Zealand, Broadsheet Size Newspapers are Newspapers printed on A1 Paper Sizes of dimensions 594 mm × 841 mm (23.4 in × 33.1 in). In 1972, the British government imposed a tax on newspaper manufacturers based on the number of pages that were there in a newspaper. This movement by the government caused the manufacturers to print newspapers on biggest papers available and also reduce font and thus reduce the number of pages. These newspapers started to print on single sheets of political satire and ballads which they sold on streets known as Broadsheet. Recently, Broadsheet is losing popularity, and many newspaper manufacturers are using Tabloid Size instead of Broadsheet Size.

British Broadsheet
375 × 597 mm14.8 × 23.5 in
Broadsheet
597 × 749 mm23.5 × 29.5 in
Canadian Tabloid
260 × 368 mm10.2 × 14.5 in
Ciner
350 × 500 mm13.8 × 19.7 in
Compact
280 × 430 mm11 × 16.9 in
New York Times
305 × 559 mm12 × 22 in
Nordisch
400 × 570 mm15.7 × 22.4 in
Norwegian Tabloid
280 × 400 mm11 × 15.7 in
Rhenish
350 × 520 mm13.8 × 20.5 in
South African Broadsheet
410 × 578 mm 16.1 × 22.8 in
Swiss320 × 475 mm 12.6 × 18.7 in 
Tabloid280 × 430 mm  11 × 16.9 in
US Broadsheet
381 × 578 mm15 × 22.8 in 
Wall Street Journal305 × 578 mm  12 × 22.8 in 

Business card paper sizes

SizesDimensions (mm)Dimensions (in)SeriesInfo
China90 × 54 mm3.5 × 2.1 inBusiness Card Paper Sizes
The standard business card size used in Europe is 85mm x 55mm, which is a similar size to banking cards, making them easier to store. The standard business card size in the US and Canada is 3.5 inches x 2 inches (89mm x 51mm). It is fairly common nowadays to move away from the traditional rectangular business card, and be more creative by having square and rounded rectangular shapes. The business card based on the ISO 216 standard is the same size as A8 which is 74mm x 52mm.
European
85 × 55 mm3.3 × 2.2 in
Iran
85 × 48 mm3.3 × 1.9 in
ISO 216
74 × 52 mm2.9 × 2 in
ISO 7819 ID-1
85.6 × 54 mm3.4 × 2.1 in
Japan
91 × 55 mm3.6 × 2.2 in
Scandinavia
90 × 55 mm3.5 × 2.2 in
US/Canada
88.9 × 50.8 mm3.5 × 2 in

Billboard paper sizes

SizesDimensions (mm)Dimensions (in)SeriesInfo
1 Sheet508 × 762 mm20 × 30 inBillboard Paper Sizes
A billboard (or a hoarding) is a large structure used for advertising, and is usually placed outdoors in areas where there is a lot of traffic, such as busy roads. Billboards are used to advertise products to passing pedestrians and drivers, and are very effective, due to their size and positioning in designated market areas. Billboards have many standard sizes, and the names of the billboards originate from the old days when posters were made up of a specific number of panels.

Popular billboard sizes start from ‘1 Sheet’ which is 508mm x 762mm, and one of the largest is ‘96 Sheet’ which is 12192mm x 3048mm (40ft x 10ft). The largest standard sized billboard is known as a Bulletin, and is 48ft x 14ft.

2 Sheet
762 × 1016 mm30 × 40 in
4 Sheet
1016 × 1524 mm40 × 60 in
6 Sheet
1200 × 1800 mm47.2 × 70.9 in
12 Sheet
3048 × 1524 mm120 × 60 in
16 Sheet
2032 × 3048 mm80 × 120 in
32 Sheet
4064 × 3048 mm160 × 120 in
48 Sheet
6096 × 3048 mm240 × 120 in
64 Sheet
8128 × 3048 mm320 × 120 in
96 Sheet
12192 × 3048 mm480 × 120 in

Transitional paper sizes

SizesDimensions (mm)Dimensions (in)SeriesInfo
F0841 × 1321 mm33.1 × 52 inTransitional Paper Sizes
The transitional paper size formats consist of the PA Series and the F Series. The PA Series proposed to be included into the ISO 216 standard in 1975. They were rejected by the committee who decided that the number of standardised paper formats should be kept to a minimum. However this series is still used today, in particular PA4 (or L4). Its width is that of the ISO standard A4, and height of Canadian P4 (210mm x 280mm). The PA4 format can easily be printed on equipment designed for A4 or US Letter size, which is why it is used by many international magazines, and is a good solution as the format of presentation slides. PA4 is more of a page format than a paper size. It has a 4:3 aspect ratio when in landscape orientation.

In Southeast Asia, a common size used is the non-standard F4. The longer side is 330mm, which is the same as the British Foolscap. The shorter side is 210mm, which is the same as the ISO A4. The F4 is occasionally known as (metric) Foolscap or Folio.

F1
660 × 841 mm26 × 33.1 in 
F2
420 × 660 mm16.5 × 26 in 
F3
330 × 420 mm13 × 16.5 in 
F4
210 × 330 mm 8.3 × 13 in
F5
165 × 210 mm 6.5 × 8.3 in 
F6
105 × 165 mm 4.1 × 6.5 in
F7
82 × 105 mm 3.2 × 4.1 in 
F8
52 × 82 mm 2 × 3.2 in 
F9
41 × 52 mm 1.6 × 2 in 
F10
26 × 41 mm 1 × 1.6 in 
PA0
840 × 1120 mm33.1 × 44.1 in 
PA1
560 × 840 mm 22 × 33.1 in 
PA2
420 × 560 mm 16.5 × 22 in 
PA3
280 × 420 mm11 × 16.5 in 
PA4
210 × 280 mm8.3 × 11 in 
PA5
140 × 210 mm 5.5 × 8.3 in 
PA6
105 × 140 mm 4.1 × 5.5 in
PA7
70 × 105 mm 2.8 × 4.1 in 
PA8
52 × 70 mm 2 × 2.8 in 
PA9
35 × 52 mm1.4 × 2 in 
PA10
26 × 35 mm1 × 1.4 in 

Photography paper sizes

SizesDimensions (mm)Dimensions (in)SeriesInfo
11R279 × 356 mm11 × 14 inPhotography Paper Sizes
Standard photographic sizes are often named with a format ‘nR’, where the number ‘n’ represents the length of the shortest side in inches. In the normal series, the longest side is the length of the shortest side plus 2 inches, when it is 10 inches or less. When it is 11 inches and above, 3 inches is added to the shortest side. There is an alternative Super series, which is named with a format ‘SnR’. This series has an aspect ratio of approximately 3:2. The aspect ratios of photographic prints tend to vary, so exact scaling of prints is not always a possibility. The Japanese photographic standard are the same print sizes, but are known by different names. For example, the Japanese L corresponds to 3R, while 2L matches 5R.
2LD, DSCW 127 × 169 mm 5 × 6.7 in
2LW 127 × 190 mm5 × 7.5 in 
2R64 × 89 mm 2.5 × 3.5 in 
3R, L 89 × 127 mm3.5 × 5 in 
4R, KG
102 × 152 mm4 × 6 in 
5R, 2L
127 × 178 mm 5 × 7 in
6R152 × 203 mm 6 × 8 in 
8R, 6P 203 × 254 mm8 × 10 in 
A3+ Super B330 × 483 mm 13 × 19 in 
LD, DSC
89 × 119 mm 3.5 × 4.7 in 
KGD 102 × 136 mm4 × 5.4 in 
LW 89 × 133 mm3.5 × 5.2 in 
Passport35 × 45 mm 1.4 × 1.8 in 
S8R, 6PW203 × 305 mm 8 × 12 in 

French paper sizes

SizesDimensions (mm)Dimensions (in)SeriesInfo
Carré450 × 560 mm17.7 × 22 inFrench Paper Sizes
Before the adoption of the ISO standard system in 1967, France had its own paper size system. Some of these formats are still used today, and they are standardized by the AFNOR. Their names come from the watermarks that the papers were branded with when they were handcrafted, which is still the case for certain art papers. They also generally exist in double versions where the smallest measure is multiplied by two, or in quadruple versions where both measures have been doubled.
Cavalier
460 × 620 mm18.1 × 24.4 in
Cloche300 × 400 mm  11.8 × 15.7 in
Colombier affiche 600 × 800 mm 23.6 × 31.5 in
Colombier commercial 630 × 900 mm24.8 × 35.4 in 
Coquille 440 × 560 mm17.3 × 22 in 
Couronne écriture360 × 360 mm 14.2 × 14.2 in 
Couronne édition 370 × 470 mm14.6 × 18.5 in 
Demi-raisin 325 × 500 mm 12.8 × 19.7 in
Double Raisin 650 × 1000 mm25.6 × 39.4 in 
Ecu400 × 520 mm 15.7 × 20.5 in 
Grand Aigle 750 × 1050 mm29.5 × 41.3 in 
Grand Monde
900 × 1260 mm 35.4 × 49.6 in 
Jésus 560 × 760 mm22 × 29.9 in 
Petit Aigle 700 × 940 mm27.6 × 37 in 
Pot, écolier310 × 400 mm 12.2 × 15.7 in 
Raisin500 × 650 mm 19.7 × 25.6 in 
Roberto 390 × 500 mm15.4 × 19.7 in 
Soleil 600 × 800 mm  23.6 × 31.5 in
Tellière340 × 440 mm 13.4 × 17.3 in 
Univers 1000 × 1130 mm 39.4 × 44.5 in

Canadian paper sizes

SizesDimensions (mm)Dimensions (in)SeriesInfo
P1560 × 860 mm22 × 33.9 inCanadian Paper Sizes
Canada adopted the ISO paper sizes in 1972. However as the use of US paper sizes is common across North America, the Standards Council of Canada introduced metric versions of the US ANSI sizes in 1976 with the Paper Sizes For Correspondance CAN 2-9.60M Standard. CAN 2-9.60M created the P series of paper sizes P1 to P6 that are the ANSI A,B,C and D paper sizes rounded to the nearest 5mm with the addition of two extra sizes smaller than ANSI A. It appears that these sizes are now obsolete. Unlike the ISO standard sizes which have the single aspect ratio of 1:root2, the Canadian P series sizes have a number of different aspect ratios, thus enlarging and reducing between the sizes is not as easy as with the ISO sizes. These sizes are also sometimes referred to as PA1, PA2 and so on.
P2
430 × 560 mm16.9 × 22 in
P3
280 × 430 mm11 × 16.9 in
P4
215 × 280 mm8.5 × 11 in
P5
140 × 215 mm5.5 × 8.5 in
P6
107 × 140 mm4.2 × 5.5 in

Colombian paper sizes

SizesDimensions (mm)Dimensions (in)SeriesInfo
1/2 pliego500 × 700 mm19.7 × 27.6inColombian Paper Sizes
The most common paper sizes used for commercial and industrial printing in Colombia are based upon a size referred to as pliego that is ISO B1 (707 mm × 1000 mm) cut to full decimetres. Smaller sizes are derived by halving as usual and just get a vulgar fraction prefix: ​1⁄2 pliego and ​1⁄4 pliego.
1/4 pliego350 × 500 mm13.8 × 19.7 in
1/8 pliego 250 × 350 mm9.8 × 13.8 in 
Carta
216 × 279 mm  8.5 × 11 in
Extra Tabloide
304 × 457.2 mm12 × 18 in 
Oficio
216 × 330 mm 8.5 × 13 in 
Pliego
700 × 1000 mm 27.6 × 39.4 in 

Chinese paper sizes

SizesDimensions (mm)Dimensions (in)SeriesInfo
D0764 × 1064 mm30.1 × 41.9 inChinese Paper Sizes
The Chinese standard GB/T 148-1997, which replaced GB 148-1989, documents the standard ISO series, A and B, but adds a custom D series. This Chinese format originates from the Republic of China (1912–49). The D series is not identical to the Swedish D series. It does not strictly follow the same principles as ISO paper sizes: The aspect ratio is only very roughly √2. The short side of a size is always 4 mm longer than the long side of the next smaller size. The long side of a size is always exactly – i.e. without further rounding – twice as long as the short side of the next smaller size.
D1
532 × 760 mm20.9 × 29.9 in
D2
380 × 528 mm15 × 20.8 in
D3
264 × 376 mm10.4 × 14.8 in
D4
188 × 260 mm7.4 × 10.2 in
D5
130× 184 mm5.1× 7.2 in
D6
92× 126 mm3.6× 5 in
RD0
787× 1092 mm31× 43 in
RD1
546× 787 mm 21.5× 31 in 
RD2
393× 546 mm 15.5× 21.5 in 
RD3
273× 393 mm10.7× 15.5 in 
RD4
196× 273 mm7.7× 10.7 in 
RD5
136× 196 mm
5.4× 7.7 in 
RD6
98× 136 mm 3.9× 5.4 in 

Japanese paper sizes

SizesDimensions (mm)Dimensions (in)SeriesInfo
JB01030 × 1456 mm40.6 × 57.3 inJapanese Paper Sizes
The JIS defines two main series of paper sizes. The JIS A-series is identical to the ISO A-series, but with slightly different tolerances. The area of B-series paper is 1.5 times that of the corresponding A-paper (instead of the factor √2 = 1.414 for the ISO B-series), so the length ratio is approximately 1.22 times the length of the corresponding A-series paper. The aspect ratio of the paper is the same as for A-series paper. Both A- and B-series paper is widely available in Japan, Taiwan and China, and most photocopiers are loaded with at least A4 and either one of A3, B4 and B5 paper. There are also a number of traditional paper sizes, which are now used mostly by printers. The most common of these old series are the Shiroku-ban and the Kiku paper sizes.
JB1
728 × 1030 mm28.7 × 40.6 in
JB2
515 × 728 mm 20.3 × 28.7 in
JB3
364 × 515 mm14.3 × 20.3 in 
JB4
257 × 364 mm10.1 × 14.3 in 
JB5
182 × 257 mm 7.2 × 10.1 in 
JB6
128 × 182 mm 5 × 7.2 in 
JB7
91 × 128 mm 3.6 × 5 in 
JB8
64 × 91 mm2.5 × 3.6 in 
JB9
45 × 64 mm 1.8 × 2.5 in 
JB10
32 × 45 mm  1.3 × 1.8 in
JB11
22 × 32 mm 0.9 × 1.3 in 
JB12
16 × 22 mm0.6 × 0.9 in 
Kiku 4
227 × 306 mm 8.9 × 12 in 
Kiku 5
151 × 227 mm 5.9 × 8.9 in 
Shiroku Ban 4
264 × 379 mm  10.4 × 14.9 in
Shiroku Ban 5
189 × 262 mm  7.4 × 10.3 in 
Shiroku Ban 6
127 × 188 mm 5 × 7.4 in 

German paper sizes

SizesDimensions (mm)Dimensions (in)SeriesInfo
DIN D0771 × 1,090 mm30.35 × 42.91inGerman DIN Paper Sizes
The German standard DIN 476 was published on 18 August 1922 and is the original specification of the A, B and C sizes. In 1991, it was split into DIN 476-1 for the A and B formats and 476-2 for the C series. The former has been withdrawn in 2002 in favor of adopting the international standard as DIN EN ISO 216, but part 2 has been retained and was last updated in 2008. The first and the second editions of DIN 476 from 1922 and 1925 also included a D series.
DIN D1
545 × 771 mm21.45 × 30.35 in
DIN D2
385 × 545 mm15.15 × 21.45 in
DIN D3
272 × 385 mm 10.7 × 15.15 in
DIN D4
192 × 272 mm7.55 × 10.7 in
DIN D5
136 × 192 mm 5.35 × 7.55 in
DIN D6
96 × 136 mm3.77 × 5.35 in
DIN D7
68 × 96 mm2.67 × 3.77 in
DIN D8
48 × 68 mm 1.88 × 2.67 in

Swedish paper sizes

SizesDimensions (mm)Dimensions (in)SeriesInfo
SIS D01091 × 1542 mm42.95 × 60.7 inSwedish Paper Sizes
The Swedish standard SIS 01 47 11 generalized the ISO system of A, B, and C formats by adding D, E, F, and G formats to it. Its D format sits between a B format and the next larger A format (just like C sits between A and the next larger B). The remaining formats fit in between all these formats, such that the sequence of formats A4, E4, C4, G4, B4, F4, D4, *H4, A3 is a geometric progression, in which the dimensions grow by a factor 16√2 from one size to the next. However, this SIS standard does not define any size between a D format and the next larger A format (called *H in the previous example).

Of these additional formats, G5 (169 × 239 mm) and E5 (155 × 220 mm) are popular in Sweden and the Netherlands for printing dissertations, but the other formats have not turned out to be particularly useful in practice. They have not been adopted internationally and the Swedish standard has been withdrawn.

The Swedish and German D series basically contain the same sizes, but are offset by one, i.e. DIN D4 equals SIS D5 and so on.

SIS D1
771 × 1091 mm30.35 × 42.95 in 
SIS D2
545 × 771 mm  21.45 × 30.35 in
SIS D3
386 × 545 mm  15.19 × 21.45 in
SIS D4
273 × 386 mm 10.74 × 15.19 in 
SIS D5
193 × 273 mm 7.59 × 10.74 in
SIS D6
136 × 193 mm 5.35 × 7.59 in
SIS D7
96 × 136 mm 3.77 × 5.35 in
SIS D8
68 × 96 mm 2.67 × 3.77 in
SIS D9
48 × 68 mm  1.88 × 2.67 in
SIS D10
34 × 48 mm 1.33 × 1.88 in 
SIS E0
878 × 1242 mm 34.56 × 48.89 in 
SIS E1
621 × 878 mm24.44 × 34.56 in 
SIS E2
439 × 621 mm17.28 × 24.44 in 
SIS E3
310 × 439 mm 12.2 × 17.28 in 
SIS E4
220 × 310 mm  8.66 × 12.2 in
SIS E5
155 × 220 mm 6.1 × 8.66 in
SIS E6
110 × 155 mm 4.33 × 6.1 in
SIS E7
78 × 110 mm 3.07 × 4.33 in
SIS E8
55 × 78 mm  2.16 × 3.07 in
SIS E9
39 × 55 mm 1.53 × 2.16 in
SIS E10
27 × 39 mm 1.06 × 1.53 in 
SIS F0
1044 × 1477 mm  41.1 × 58.14 in
SIS F1
738 × 1044 mm 29.05 × 41.1 in
SIS F2
522 × 738 mm 20.55 × 29.05 in
SIS F3
369 × 522 mm14.52 × 20.55 in 
SIS F4
261 × 369 mm10.27 × 14.52 in 
SIS F5
185 × 261 mm 7.28 × 10.27 in 
SIS F6
131 × 185 mm5.15 × 7.28 in 
SIS F7
92 × 131 mm 3.62 × 5.15 in 
SIS F8
65 × 92 mm2.55 × 3.62 in 
SIS F9
46 × 65 mm1.81 × 2.55 in 
SIS F10
33 × 46 mm1.29 × 1.81 in 
SIS G0
958 × 1354 mm 37.71 × 53.3 in 
SIS G1
677 × 958 mm  26.65 × 37.71 in
SIS G2
479 × 677 mm 18.85 × 26.65 in
SIS G3
339 × 479 mm  13.34 × 18.85 in
SIS G4
239 × 339 mm 9.4 × 13.34 in 
SIS G5
169 × 239 mm6.65 × 9.4 in 
SIS G6
120 × 169 mm4.72 × 6.65 in 
SIS G7
85 × 120 mm3.34 × 4.72 in 
SIS G8
60 × 85 mm 2.36 × 3.34 in
SIS G9
42 × 60 mm 1.65 × 2.36 in 
SIS G10
30 × 42 mm1.18 × 1.65 in 

Traditional British paper sizes

SizesDimensions (mm)Dimensions (in)SeriesInfo
Dukes140 × 178 mm5.5 × 7 inTraditional British Paper Sizes
Before the advent of ISO 216, England, the British Isles and the British Commonwealth countries used a variety of paper sizes, many of which have unusual names such as Double Crown, Elephant, Double Elephant, Demy, Double Pott and Columbier. Although they are now almost forgotten these paper sizes may still be obtained from specialist paper manufacturers.
Foolscap
203 × 330 mm8 × 13 in
Imperial
178 × 229 mm7 × 9 in
Kings
165 × 203 mm6.5 × 8 in
Quarto
203 × 254 mm8 × 10 in

Imperial paper sizes

SizesDimensions (mm)Dimensions (in)SeriesInfo
Antiquarian787 × 1346 mm31 × 53 inImperial Paper Sizes
Imperial sizes were used in the United Kingdom and its territories and some survived in US book printing. These sizes are no longer so widely used, since the UK began using ISO sizes. Many of these sizes were only used for making books (see bookbinding), or for publishing plays (historically, all the published plays of William Shakespeare during his lifetime were printed in Quarto), or for printing story papers and comics, and most types were not offered for ordinary stationery purposes, except foolscap (which was commonly used in schools and universities). Foolscap folio is often referred to simply as “folio” or “foolscap”. Similarly, “quarto” is more correctly “copy draught quarto” and “Kings” is an alias for “Foolscap quarto”.






























Atlas
660 × 864 mm26 × 34 in
Brief343 × 406 mm 13.5 × 16 in 
Broadsheet457 × 610 mm 18 × 24 in 
Cartridge 533 × 660 mm 21 × 26 in
Columber 597 × 876 mm 23.5 × 34.5 in
Copy Draught
406 × 508 mm 16 × 20 in
Crown 381 × 508 mm15 × 20 in 
Demy 445 × 572 mm 17.5 × 22.5 in
Double Demy 572 × 902 mm22.5 × 35.5 in 
Double Elephant
678 × 1016 mm 26.7 × 40 in
Double Large Post533 × 838 mm 21 × 33 in 
Double Post 483 × 762 mm 19 × 30 in
Elephant 584 × 711 mm 23 × 28 in
Emperor 1219 × 1829 mm48 × 72 in 
Foolscap 343 × 432 mm13.5 × 17 in 
Grand Eagle730 × 1067 mm 28.7 × 42 in 
Imperial 559 × 762 mm 22 × 30 in
Large Post 394 × 508 mm15.5 × 20 in 
Medium 470 × 584 mm18.5 × 23 in 
Monarch 184 × 267 mm 7.2 × 10.5 in
Pinched Post375 × 470 mm 14.8 × 18.5 in 
Post 394 × 489 mm 15.5 × 19.3 in
Pott 318 × 381 mm 12.5 × 15 in
Princess 546 × 711 mm 21.5 × 28 in
Quad Demy 889 × 1143 mm35 × 45 in 
Quarto229 × 279 mm 9 × 11 in 
Royal508 × 635 mm  20 × 25 in
Sheet, Half Post
495 × 597 mm 19.5 × 23.5 in
Small Foolscap337 × 419 mm  13.3 × 16.5 in
Super Royal
483 × 686 mm  19 × 27 in